How to Be a Better Leader by Connecting with Respect

By |2020-02-19T08:06:37-05:00February 18th, 2020|Categories: Respectful Workplace|Tags: , |

Most of us have had at least one opportunity to report to a truly great leader or manager. Great leaders inspire us, challenge us, help us see the big picture and find ways to get the best out of us (sometimes even more than we knew was there ourselves). Unfortunately, many of us have had [...]

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Using Science to Help Run Better Meetings

By |2020-01-30T15:46:36-05:00January 30th, 2020|Categories: Respectful Workplace|Tags: , |

We've all been a part of "meetings from hell" - late starting meetings with no agenda that run long and accomplish nothing. If this scenario sounds even a little bit familiar, have no fear. It turns out that science actually offers up some pretty simple and straightforward strategies that can benefit us all.

Why your company needs a Code of Cooperation and how to create one

By |2019-09-25T14:41:52-04:00September 15th, 2019|Categories: Respectful Workplace|Tags: |

A Code of Cooperation is a document created by people who work together to encourage an emotionally healthy work environment. It accomplishes this by formally establishing common behavioral expectations that can be supported by all. Codes of Cooperation may articulate both behaviors which a group wishes to encourage as well as those to be avoided. They should be created with input from all group members and are most effective when embraced and supported by everyone.

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Gen U – Generation Unretired – Humanizes The Workplace

By |2019-06-18T21:42:01-04:00October 5th, 2016|Categories: Respectful Workplace|Tags: , , , |

There has been a lot of discussion lately about the “unretired” – seniors who are returning to the workforce in droves for economic or personal reasons. I call this formidable group “Gen U™” because they represent an astounding number of people who have a completely different mindset from that of prior retired generations. Thankfully, smart companies are beginning to embrace their value, wisdom and experience.

5 Quick Steps to Improve the Psyche of Your Employees

By |2016-03-24T09:58:44-04:00March 24th, 2016|Categories: Respectful Workplace|Tags: , |

It is important to maintain a healthy and open-minded environment in your workplace; your employees are your ships, and you are their lighthouse. You need each other to make the company work. Make sure that however you act, that’s how your employees will feel about you. We’re here to give you 5 tips on how you can get your working atmosphere to a positive and productive level.

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The True “Value” of Values

By |2019-06-19T16:25:26-04:00December 18th, 2015|Categories: Respectful Workplace|Tags: , |

How often are employees in your workplace reminded about your workplace values? How do you think it might affect your business results if your values were truly lived in your workplace, supporting a positive and respectful workplace community? Everyone succeeds when workplace practices are aligned with values, and in particular the ethical value of respect. The reason is simple; values are the glue that unite us in our humanity.

Diversity as a Noun…Inclusion as a Verb

By |2017-01-13T13:41:45-05:00November 16th, 2015|Categories: Respectful Workplace|Tags: , , |

The unfortunate trend that has become overly apparent to me is that diversity has really just become a numbers game. Organizations are spending their resources trying to diversify their candidate pool, hire more diverse candidates, and do more in the underserved communities. My question is: what comes after “diversity”?

Dreaming of a Happier Workplace

By |2017-01-13T13:41:50-05:00July 21st, 2015|Categories: Respectful Workplace|Tags: , |

How many conflicts could be averted if we had selective amnesia with our rivals or foes? Our conversations would then be free of the tiny microexpressions and unconscious vocal tones that send out defensive messages (despite our best intentions). The problem is, our brain scrutinizes our environment for threats and then sears these threat-memories deep into our mind — for our protection. Our brain doesn’t want us to have amnesia precisely because we would then be more vulnerable to dangers around us. Even if we can’t control our unconscious nonverbal behaviors, we can try to compensate for them.

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